Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography

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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station , Portland, Or. (333 S.W. First Ave., P.O. Box 3890, Portland 97208)
Landscape ecology -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works, Landscape changes -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works, Biotic communities -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works, Forest ecology -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- History -- Pictorial works, Repeat photography -- Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.), Blue Mountains (Or. and Wash.) -- Pictorial
StatementJon M. Skovlin and Jack Ward Thomas
GenrePictorial works
SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- GTR-315, General technical report PNW -- 315
ContributionsThomas, Jack Ward
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationii, 102 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18296719M

Get this from a library. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. [Jon M Skovlin; Jack Ward Thomas; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)].

Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography (OCoLC) Microfiche version: Skovlin, Jon M.

Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type. Author of Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography, Fluctuations in forage quality on summer range in the Blue Mountains, Hank Vaughan,In pursuit of the McCartys, Winter diets of elk and deer in the Blue Mountains, Oregon, Timber harvest affects elk distribution in the Blue Mountains of Oregon.

Thomas, Jack Ward: Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography / (Portland, Or. ( S.W. First Ave., P.O. BoxPortland ): U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), also by Jon M. Skovlin and Or.) Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland (page.

Given the advantages of digital repeat photography in terms of logistics, consistency, continuity and objectivity, we expect growing archives of landscape images to become important data streams for phenological research.

One crucial aspect for long-term measurements is the stability of the measured by: Interpreting Landscape Change in High Mountains of Northeastern Oregon from Long-Term Repeat Photography Jon M. Skovlin, Gerald S. Strickler, Jesse L. Peterson, and Arthur W.

Sampson United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General Technical Report PNW-GTR May Photo by Harley Richardson. Cornett; Interpreting Long-Term Trends in Blue Mountain Ecosystems from Repeat Photography by Jon M.

Skovlin, Jack Ward Thomas; Time and the Tuolumne Landscape: Continuity and Change in the Yosemite High Country by Thomas R.

Vale, Geraldine R. Vale. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. General Technical Report PNW-GTR Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station. The Other Oregon Cox, Thomas R. Published by Oregon State University Press Cox, Thomas R.

The Other Oregon: People, Environment, and History East of the Cascades. 1 ed. Oregon Sta. This book assembles dramatic paired photographs to demonstrate both the persistence of nature and the presence of humanity. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Author: Dawna Cerney.

GTR () Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography by J.M. Skovlin and J.W. Thomas. GTR () Volume I: Executive summary by R. Everett, P.

Hessburg, M. Jensen, and B. Bormann. Interpreting long‑term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. Portland, OR U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report.

In all, repeat-photosets were compiled – by the author and 18 by Earl Hindley. As might be expected, most photosets contained more than one vegetation type. Grasslands were depicted in photosets, sagebrush in 99, pinyon-juniper inmountain brush in 72, aspen in 37, conifers inblackbrush in 71, and woody riparian species.

used repeat photography as a scien-tific tool in the United States. InHomer Shantz repeated images he had taken on and excursions from Cape Town to Cairo in Africa (Shantz and Turner, ).

This publication, the first book-length report of landscape change relying entirely on repeat photography, was. mountain ecosystems. Long-term experiments and monitoring track the changes occurring at the Andrews and beyond, enabling scientists to distinguish short-term fl uctuations from underlying trends, and to draw robust conclusions about gradual changes that often prove diffi cult to.

embedded. Repeat photography can be a valuable tool in documenting and interpreting the causes of landscape changes.

Outstanding Southwestern examples are the seminal The Changing Mile (Hastings and Turner ), A Legacy of. Long-term MODIS vegetation index records were used to extract regularly-repeating seasonal and interannual greenness cycles in Hawaiian ecosystems using harmonic analysis.

With two vegetation indices, NDVI and EVI, the MODIS system provided an opportunity to combine the two measures and create a hybrid approach to the leafFile Size: KB.

For the entire lake population, temporal trends in Secchi depth from to were positive (average of all lake specific long-term trends), suggesting an overall increase in water clarity. The posterior estimate for the mean slope, (Eq.

Details Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography PDF

1) wasindicating that Secchi depth, on average, has been increasing by % per year (95%. Interpreting long-term trends in Blue Mountain ecosystems from repeat photography. General Technical Report PNW, USDA Forest Service Pacific Cited by:   The sustainable use and management of important tropical coastal ecosystems (mangrove forests, seagrass beds and coral reefs) cannot be done without understanding the direct and indirect impacts of man.

The ecosystem's resilience and recovery capacity following such impacts must be determined. The efficacy of mitigation measures must also be by: Soil testing can also be used to monitor long-term trends, but special precautions (e.g., uniform depth and locations of sampling, and method of analysis) are needed.

Units of measurement: Most laboratories use metric units, such as µg/g (µg g-1) or mg/kg (mg kg-1), for expressing their extraction values.

Both units are equivalent to ‘parts. Ecosystems – Download PDF Negative relationships between species richness and evenness render common diversity indices inadequate for assessing long-term trends in butterfly diversity.

Biodiversity and Vegetation phenology can be captured with digital repeat photography and linked to variability of root nutrition in.

Full text of "Fire and vegetative trends in the northern Rockies: interpretations from photographs" See other formats.

Book chapter: Publication Subtype: Book Chapter: Title: Using natural archives to track sources and long-term trends of pollution: some final thoughts and suggestions for future directions: DOI: /_ Edition: 1: Year Published: Language: English: Publisher: Springer Netherlands: Contributing office(s) Office of.

Most of my professional life has encompassed researching, preserving, and writing about CSU’s past. I came Fort Collins in with a background in the history of higher education, and six years later, initiated a project that resulted in an institutional archive and a comprehensive study, Democracy’s College in the Centennial State ().

More than a dozen publications ensued. vegetation, 2) historical reconstructions using long-term monitoring data, historical records, or photography, 3) recent monitoring data, including responses to climate variability and management interventions, and 4) process-based research and studies that test for the mechanisms causing or constraining ecosystem Size: 2MB.

EPA/ July Research on Fish and Wildlife Habitat Technical Editor William T.

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Mason, Jr. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Leetown, West Virginia Consulting Editor Sam Iker Chevy Chase, Maryland Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. The Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) is an international non‐profit organization with members in 70 countries.

SER advances the science, practice and policy of ecological restoration to sustain biodiversity, improve resilience in a changing climate, and re‐establish an ecologically healthy relationship between nature and by: Golden Eagles: Long Term Conservation Impacts of Exotic Introductions on a Small Native Population W Nichols K.S.

Bird Collisions from an Architectural Perspective: An Analysis of a Long-term Citizen Science Monitoring Project WS Bayne, E.; Estimating population sizes of landbirds from non-standardized point-count surveys inFile Size: 4MB. Study BIO Study Guide ( Long) flashcards from StudyBlue on StudyBlue.

The trends in these species are probably linked to long-term changes in land use leading to, respectively, increasing habitat suitability for increasers and the loss and fragmentation of habitats for decreasers (Warren et al.

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; Opdam and Wasscher ; Pöyry et al. ). Thus, our results underline the importance of not overestimating Cited by: made about these key ecosystems, outlining existing trends in climate, as well as future climate change scenarios (Chapter 2), current understanding of the impacts of climate changes, and likely sensitivities to future impacts (Chapters 1 and 3).

The workshop identified potential signsFile Size: KB.Start studying methods and research. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.